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Quote Author Cited
To permit ourselves to be provoked into violence would mean defeating ourselves; our real power is in our solidarity and our capacity to endure suffering rather than to give up the fight for the right to organize; no one can weave wool with machine guns; that cheerfulness was better for morale than bitterness and that therefore we would smile as we passed the machine guns and the police on the way from the hall to the picket lines around the mills. A. J. Muste
It was the spirit of the workers that was dangerous. They are always marching and singing. The tired, gray crowds ebbing and flowing perpetually into the mills had waked and opened their months to sing. Mary Heaton Vorse
Twenty thousand textile workers in Lawrence had walked out against a wage cut. It was a sudden, unplanned uprising. A fifty-four-hour week for women and children had been put into effect in Massachusetts, and the textile industry employed so many women and children that it meant a fifty-four-hour week for everyone. Consequently, there was a wage cut. It was a small cut, but it meant "four loaves of bread" to the workers. Mary Heaton Vorse
Here live women, the mothers of many children, who work at night. These women have never rested. They do not know what an unburdened hour is. Five nights a week for ten hours they work for a quarter an hour at midnight. Mary Heaton Vorse
It's just that we wanted it to arrive as soon as possible. Anonymous
Certainly he had none of a gentleman's instincts, strutting about peace conferences in Arab dress. Henry Channon
My contempt for the instruments of public information—particularly the press, is unlimited ... Stephen Pierce Duggan
Bayonets cannot weave cloth. Joseph J. Ettor
Would you approve of your young sons, young daughters—because girls can read as well as boys—reading this book? Is it a book that you would have lying around in your own house? Is it a book that you would even wish your wife or your servants to read? Mervyn Griffith-Jones
All the business houses, banks, stores, etc., in the city were robbed and burned save one, and... most of the businessmen killed.... Mrs. Reed put out the fire six times to save her house, and they would fire it anew, but she by almost superhuman exertions saved it.... One lady threw her arms around her husband, and begged of them to spare his life. They rested the pistol on her arm as it was around his body, and shot him dead, and the fire from the pistol burnt the sleeve of her dress….The very air seems charged with blood and death.... The fires were still glowing in the cellars... Here and there among the embers could be seen the bones of those who had perished.... The sickening odor of burned flesh was oppressive. Pandemonium itself seems to have broken loose... and death runs riot over the country…. Julia Louisa Lovejoy
Kill! Kill! Lawrence must be cleansed, and the only way to cleanse it is to kill! William Clarke Quantrill
An idea consisting of a social crime in one age becomes the very religion of humanity in the next Joseph J. Ettor
Does the District Attorney believe . . . that the gallows or guillotine ever settled an idea? If an idea can live, it lives because history adjudges it right. I ask only for justice …. The scaffold has never yet and never will destroy an idea or a movement. …Whatever my social views are, they are what they are. They cannot be tried in this courtroom. Joseph J. Ettor