Paul R. Ehrlich

(Paul Ralph Ehrlich)

Paul R. Ehrlich
Paul R. Ehrlich
  • Born: May 29, 1932
  • Nationality: American
  • Profession: Scientist

9

Quotes

4

Citations

27

Concepts

0

Videos

Paul Ralph Ehrlich is an American biologist, best known for his warnings about the consequences of population growth and limited resources. He is the Bing Professor of Population Studies of the Department of Biology of Stanford University and president of Stanford's Center for Conservation Biology.

Quotes About
Author Quote
Quotes
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Actually, the problem in the world is that there is much too many rich people Economics, The Economy & Fiscal Affairs
Solving the population problem is not going to solve the problems of racism… of sexism… of religious intolerance… of war… of gross economic inequality—But if you don’t solve the population problem, you’re not going to solve any of those problems. Whatever problem you’re interested in, you’re not going to solve it unless you also solve the population problem. Whatever your cause, it’s a lost cause without population control. Privacy, Abortion & Family Planning
The causal chain of the deterioration (of the environment) is easily followed to its source. Too many cars, too many factories, too much detergent, too much pesticide, multiplying contrails, inadequate sewage treatment plants, too little water, too much carbon dioxide---all can be traced easily to too many people. Environment & Environmentalism
The key to understanding overpopulation is not population density but the numbers of people in an area relative to its resources and the capacity of the environment to sustain human activities; that is, to the area’s carrying capacity. When is an area overpopulated? When its population can’t be maintained without rapidly depleting nonrenewable resources.... By this standard, the entire planet and virtually every nation is already vastly overpopulated Privacy, Abortion & Family Planning
I see harm reduction as a way of engaging people as part of that path to recovery.
The first rule of intelligent tinkering is to save all the parts.
The National Academy of Sciences would be unable to give a unanimous decision if asked whether the sun would rise tomorrow.
To err is human, but to really foul things up you need a computer. Science, Mathematics, Engineering & Technology
We're one of the most highly regulated industries, and we have to pay attention to what government is doing. Government