Lawrence Lessig

(Lester Lawrence Lessig III)

Lawrence Lessig
Lawrence Lessig
  • Born: June 3, 1961
  • Nationality: American
  • Profession: Educator

49

Quotes

23

Citations

171

Concepts

0

Videos

Quotes
Quote Topics Cited
A time is marked not so much by ideas that are argued about as by ideas that are taken for granted. History
All around us are the consequences of the most significant technological, and hence cultural, revolution in generations Science, Mathematics, Engineering & Technology
All around us are the consequences of the most significant technological, and hence cultural, revolution in generations. This revolution has produced the most powerful and diverse spur to innovation of any in modern times. Science, Mathematics, Engineering & Technology
Americans have been selling this view around the world: that progress comes from perfect protection of intellectual property. Notwithstanding the fact that the most innovative and progressive space we've seen — the Internet — has been the place where intellectual property has been least respected. You know, facts don't get in the way of this ideology. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
Creativity and innovation always builds on the past. The past always tries to control the creativity that builds upon it. Free societies enable the future by limiting this power of the past. Ours is less and less a free society. Freedom & Liberty
If the only way a library can offer an Internet exhibit about the New Deal is to hire a lawyer to clear the rights to every image and sound, then the copyright system is burdening creativity in a way that has never been seen before Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
If you understand this refrain, you're gonna' understand everything I want to say to you today. It has four parts: Creativity and innovation always builds on the past. The past always tries to control the creativity that builds upon it ., Free societies enable the future by limiting this power of the past ., Ours is less and less a free society. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
It's a bumper sticker culture. People have to get it like that, and if they don't, if it takes three seconds to make them understand, you're off their radar screen. Miscellaneous ;Capitalism
Law and technology produce, together, a kind of regulation of creativity we've not seen before. Regulation & Deregulation
Monopolies are not justified by theory; they should be permitted only when justified by facts. If there is no solid basis for extending a certain monopoly protection, then we should not extend that protection. This does not mean that every copyright must prove its value initially. That would be a far too cumbersome system of control. But it does mean that every system or category of copyright or patent should prove its worth. Before the monopoly should be permitted, there must be reason to believe it will do some good — for society, and not just for monopoly holders. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
Overregulation stifles creativity. It smothers innovation. It gives dinosaurs a veto over the future. Development & Growth
That free culture was carried to America; that was our birth — 1790. We established a regime that left creativity unregulated. Now it was unregulated because copyright law only covered "printing." Copyright law did not control derivative work. And copyright law granted this protection for the limited time of 14 years. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
The current term of protection for software is the life of an author plus 70 years, or, if it's work-for-hire, a total of 95 years. This is a bastardization of the Constitution's requirement that copyright be for "limited times." By the time Apple's Macintosh operating system finally falls into the public domain, there will be no machine that could possibly run it. The term of copyright for software is effectively unlimited. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
There has never been a time in history when more of our "culture" was as "owned" as it is now. And yet there has never been a time when the concentration of power to control the uses of culture has been as unquestioningly accepted as it is now. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
We Americans have a long history of fighting "big," wisely or not. War & Peace
We are on the cusp of this time where I can say, "I speak as a citizen of the world" without others saying, "God, what a nut. Citizenship & Patriotism ;Capitalism
We are on the cusp of this time where I can say, "I speak as a citizen of the world" without others saying, "God, what a nut. Citizenship & Patriotism
We have a massive system to regulate creativity. A massive system of lawyers regulating creativity as copyright law has expanded in unrecognizable forms, going from a regulation of publishing to a regulation of copying. Law and technology produce, together, a kind of regulation of creativity we've not seen before. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
We live in a world with "free" content, and this freedom is not an imperfection. We listen to the radio without paying for the songs we hear; we hear friends humming tunes that they have not licensed. We tell jokes that reference movie plots without the permission of the directors. We read our children books, borrowed from a library, without paying the original copyright holder for the performance rights. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
What everyone knows" is the line between us and them. Morality, Ethics & Conflict of Interest
When government disappears, it's not as if paradise will take its place. When governments are gone, other interests will take their place. Power ;Government ;States. Nations & Nationhood
Writing" is the Latin of our times. The modern language of the people is video and sound. Arts, Culture, Entertainment & Lifestyle
You can't incent a dead person. No matter what we do, Hawthorne will not produce any more works, no matter how much we pay him. Copyrights, Patents & Intellectual Property
A culture without property, or in which creators can't get paid, is anarchy, not freedom. Freedom & Liberty
A free culture has been our past, but it will only be our future if we change the path we are on right now. Future
A free culture is not a culture without property; it is not a culture in which artists don't get paid.
A time is marked not so much by ideas that are argued about as by ideas that are taken for granted. The character of an era hangs upon what needs no defense. Time
All around us are the consequences of the most significant technological, and hence cultural, revolution in generations.
Americans have been selling this view around the world: that progress comes from perfect protection of intellectual property.
As we've seen, our constitutional system requires limits on copyright as a way to assure that copyright holders do not too heavily influence the development and distribution of our culture.
Before the monopoly should be permitted, there must be reason to believe it will do some good - for society, and not just for monopoly holders. Society
Believing we know what makes prosperity work, ignoring the nature of the actual prosperity all around, we change the rules within which the Internet revolution lives. These changes will end the revolution. Nature ;Work, Workers & The Labor Force
By the time Apple's Macintosh operating system finally falls into the public domain, there will be no machine that could possibly run it. The term of copyright for software is effectively unlimited. Time
Copyrights have not expired, and will not expire, so long as Congress is free to be bought to extend them again.
If the Internet teaches us anything, it is that great value comes from leaving core resources in a commons, where they're free for people to build upon as they see fit.
If the only way a library can offer an Internet exhibit about the New Deal is to hire a lawyer to clear the rights to every image and sound, then the copyright system is burdening creativity in a way that has never been seen before because there are no formalities.
In these times, the hardest task for social or political activists is to find a way to get people to wonder again about what we all believe is true. The challenge is to sow doubt.
Monopoly controls have been the exception in free societies; they have been the rule in closed societies.
Notwithstanding the fact that the most innovative and progressive space we've seen - the Internet - has been the place where intellectual property has been least respected. You know, facts don't get in the way of this ideology.
Now that copyrights can be just about a century long, the inability to know what is protected and what is not protected becomes a huge and obvious burden on the creative process.
Of all the creative work produced by humans anywhere, a tiny fraction has continuing commercial value. For that tiny fraction, the copyright is a crucially important legal device. Work, Workers & The Labor Force ;Law, Courts, Jails, Crime & Law Enforcement
Power runs with ideas that only the crazy would draw into doubt. Power
Remember the refrain: We always build on the past; the past always tries to stop us. Freedom is about stopping the past, but we have lost that ideal. Freedom & Liberty
So uncritically do we accept the idea of property in culture that we don't even question when the control of that property removes our ability, as a people, to develop our culture democratically.
The danger in media concentration comes not from the concentration, but instead from the feudalism that this concentration, tied to the change in copyright, produces.
The real harm of term extension comes not from these famous works. The real harm is to the works that are not famous, not commercially exploited, and no longer available as a result. Fame
This does not mean that every copyright must prove its value initially. That would be a far too cumbersome system of control. But it does mean that every system or category of copyright or patent should prove its worth.
We have a massive system to regulate creativity. A massive system of lawyers regulating creativity as copyright law has expanded in unrecognizable forms, going from a regulation of publishing to a regulation of copying.
While the creative works from the 16th century can still be accessed and used by others, the data in some software programs from the 1990s is already inaccessible.