John Vane

(Sir John Robert Vane)

John Vane
John Vane
  • Born: March 29, 1927
  • Died: November 19, 2004
  • Nationality: English
  • Profession: Scientist

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Sir John Robert Vane FRS was an English pharmacologist who was instrumental in the understanding of how aspirin produces pain-relief and anti-inflammatory effects and his work led to new treatments for heart and blood vessel disease and introduction of ACE inhibitors. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1982 along with Sune Bergström and Bengt Samuelsson for "their discoveries concerning prostaglandins and related biologically active substances".

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After qualifying for a B.Sc. in pharmacology, I spent a few months in Sheffield University as a research worker in the pharmacology department but then went back to Oxford to the Nuffield Institute for Medical Research in order to study for a D. Phil. with Dr. Geoffrey Dawes. Health, Healthcare & Medicine
At first, I was able to use a Bunsen burner attached to my mother's gas stove, but the use of the kitchen as a laboratory came to an abrupt end when a minor explosion involving hydrogen sulphide spattered the newly painted decor and changed the colour from blue to dirty green!
At the age of 12, my parents gave me a chemistry set for Christmas, and experimentation soon became a consuming passion in my life. Life
Fundamental discoveries can and should be made in industry or academies, but to carry that knowledge forward and to develop a new drug to the market has to depend on the resources of industry. Education, Learning, Knowledge & Training
It is sometimes said that the major discoveries have already been made and that there is nothing important left to find. This attitude is altogether too pessimistic. There are plenty of ideas and plenty of things left to discover. The trick is to find the right path from one to the other.
Mammalian cells of all types disgorge prostaglandins at the slightest provocation, but the tissue content of prostaglandins is very low compared with the release.
Most uses of bioassay involving smooth muscle demand high sensitivity and specificity.
Physiology has spawned many biological sciences, amongst them my own field of pharmacology.
Plainly, when perfusate from an organ or blood from an animal is used for superfusion, substances can reach the assay tissues within a few seconds of generation or release.
The medicines of today are based upon thousands of years of knowledge accumulated from folklore, serendipity and scientific discovery. The new medicines of tomorrow will be based on the discoveries that are being made now, arising from basic research in laboratories around the world. Education, Learning, Knowledge & Training
Ways have to be found to maintain university research untramelled by requirements of forecasting application or usefulness.
We lived in a suburb of Birmingham where I attended the local state school from the age of five. I then went on to King Edward VI High School in Edgbaston, Birmingham.