Gary L. Francione

(Gary Lawrence Francione)

Gary L. Francione
Gary L. Francione
  • Born: May 2, 1954
  • Nationality: American
  • Profession: Distinguished Professor Law Nicholas DeB. Katzenbach Scholar Law & Philosophy, Rutgers School Law–Newark

13

Quotes

2

Citations

16

Concepts

0

Videos

Gary Lawrence Francione is an American legal scholar. He is the Distinguished Professor of Law and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Scholar of Law & Philosophy at Rutgers School of Law–Newark.

Quotes About
Author Quote
Quotes
Quote Topics Cited
There is no meaningful distinction between eating flesh and eating dairy or other animal products. Animals exploited in the dairy industry live longer than those used for meat, but they are treated worse during their lives, and they end up in the same slaughterhouse after which we consume their flesh anyway. There is probably more suffering in a glass of milk or an ice cream cone than there is in a steak. Humor ;Nutrition, Food, Starvation, Farming & Agriculture ;Animals
There is no meaningful distinction between eating flesh and eating dairy or other animal products. Animals exploited in the dairy industry live longer than those used for meat, but they are treated worse during their lives, and they end up in the same slaughterhouse after which we consume their flesh anyway. There is probably more suffering in a glass of milk or an ice cream cone than there is in a steak. Humor ;Nutrition, Food, Starvation, Farming & Agriculture ;Animals
Because animals are property, we consider as 'humane treatment' that we would regard as torture if it were inflicted on humans.
Just as we reject racism, sexism, ageism, and heterosexism, we reject speciesism. The species of a sentient being is no more reason to deny the protection of this basic right than race, sex, age, or sexual orientation is a reason to deny membership in the human moral community to other humans.
Michael Vick may enjoy watching dogs fight. Someone else may find that repulsive but see nothing wrong with eating an animal who has had a life as full of pain and suffering as the lives of the fighting dogs. It's strange that we regard the latter as morally different from, and superior to, the former. Life
Most of the time, those who use animals in experiments justify that use by pointing to alleged benefits to human and animal health and the supposed necessity of using animals to obtain those benefits. Time ;Health, Healthcare & Medicine
The proposition that humans have mental characteristics wholly absent in non-humans is inconsistent with the theory of evolution.
There is increasing social concern about our use of nonhumans for experiments, food, clothing and entertainment. This concern about animals reflects both our own moral development as a civilization and our recognition that the differences between humans and animals are, for the most part, differences of degree and not of kind. Nutrition, Food, Starvation, Farming & Agriculture
There is no moral distinction between fur and other materials made from animals, such as leather, which also is the result of the suffering and death of sentient beings. Death
There is no 'need' for us to eat meat, dairy or eggs. Indeed, these foods are increasingly linked to various human diseases and animal agriculture is an environmental disaster for the planet.
We do not need to eat animals, wear animals, or use animals for entertainment purposes, and our only defense of these uses is our pleasure, amusement, and convenience.
We do not think clearly about our moral obligations to animals.
We eat animals because they taste good. And if that's O.K., what's wrong with wearing fur? We need as a society to think seriously about our institutionalized animal use. Society