Dan DeCarlo

(Daniel S. DeCarlo)

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  • Born: December 12, 1919
  • Died: December 19, 2001
  • Nationality: American
  • Profession: Cartoonist

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Daniel S. DeCarlo was an American cartoonist best known as the artist who developed the look of Archie Comics in the late 1950s and early 1960s, modernizing the characters to their contemporary appearance and establishing the publisher's house style up until his death. As well, he is the generally recognized co-creator of the characters Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Josie and the Pussycats (with the lead character named for his wife), and Cheryl Blossom.

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After about twenty issues of Josie, they decided to pay me.
Because they feel that without them telling you to do this, you wouldn't have had the characters that you have, you wouldn't have the book that you have.
I brought samples in, because I didn't have any comic book samples, and I brought all these illustrations that I had influenced by Norman Rockwell and a couple of the other big boys. That's all I had, that's all I brought.
I designed all the characters, anyway, and Frank Doyle was doing all the writing. I didn't have any more input on what direction they were going to go with Josie.
I started working with Timely in 1946. Stan Lee hired me.
Once publishers got interested in it, it was a year in developing, and it was launched, I think, in 1960. But Willie Lumpkin didn't last long - it only last a little better than a year, maybe a year and a half.
That's the problem today: Who is the creator?
The first book that they gave me was Jeannie, a young teenager. I went on with her maybe ten books.
Then he took me off Jeannie and he gave me Millie the Model. That was a big break for me. It wasn't doing to well and somehow when I got on it became quite successful.
Then is when I decided to take it to Archie to see if they could do it as a comic book. I showed it to Richard Goldwater, and he showed it to his father, and a day or two later I got the OK to do it as a comic book.
There were eleven publishers in New York City, and when it was all over, I think it went down to four or five, and then finally just the three of them, the Big Three.
What made me want to go into doing comics was I was working as a laborer with my father, a gardener.
When I found this opportunity to answer the ad, I got the job and I've been there ever since.